txchnologist:

The world’s first 3-D printed car took to the streets this weekend after being built in an amazingly short 44 hours. The vehicle, called Strati, was designed by Italian designer Michele Anoé, who won an international competition held by crowdsourcing carmaker Local Motors.  It was printed and rapidly assembled by a Local Motors team during a manufacturing technology show held last week in Chicago, then went on a drive on Saturday. 

Strati’s chassis and body were made in one piece out of a carbon fiber-impregnated plastic on a large-area 3-D printer. The machine put down layer after layer of the material at a rate of 40 pounds per hour.

Read More

(via sci-universe)

sci-universe:

rocketssurgery:

Decided to make a handy graphic after seeing a lot of misinformation spread around tumblr. Current science isn’t perfect and definitions are bound to change, but I wanted to push back against the hostile attitude against it because it seems like a lot of people are being hostile for the wrong reasons.

Please let me know if there are any factual errors, thank you :)

Stop spreading misinformation, and start spreading this! Yay.

sci-universe:

These are various photographs of NGC 6302, the Butterfly Nebula (also called the Bug Nebula) which lies about 4,000 light-years away in the constellation of Scorpion. The structure in it is among the most complex ever observed in planetary nebulae. The spectrum of NGC 6302 shows that its central star is one of the hottest stars in the galaxy, with a surface temperature in excess of 250,000°C (450,000°F), implying that the star from which it formed must have been veeery large.

"It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow."
- Robert Goddard (1882-1945), engineer, professor, physicist, and inventor who is credited with creating and building the world’s first liquid-fueled rocket (via sci-universe)

(via sci-universe)

sci-universe:

I thought I should post something about my physics studies, sooo this is a practical work I did in a course called Physical Measurements. (I’m showing a fraction of it because it’s the fun part, I assume you don’t want to see the 5 pages of following calculations.) Among other tasks, I had to generate different figures (called Lissajous curves) for relationships between the frequencies of vertical and horizontal sinusoidal inputs by using an oscilloscope (see above). It’s a laboratory instrument which is used to display and analyze the waveform of electronic signals. In effect, the device draws a graph of the instantaneous signal voltage as a function of time. The gifs show what it looked like in practice, and graphs what it looks like in theory.

9c9bs:

The real problem with people fussing over Pluto all the time is it represents the priorities of the public - preserving traditions rather than accepting facts. The pursuit of science is about building a sustainable catalog of truths, and there is no advantage in altering truths to appease nostalgia. 

(via sci-universe)

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.
Also see Curie on science and wonder.

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.

Also see Curie on science and wonder.

(via sci-universe)

teded:

A Guide to the Energy of the Earth

Energy moves in and out of Earth’s physical systems, and during any energy transfer between them, some energy is lost to the surroundings as heat, light, sound, vibration, or movement.

Our planet’s energy comes from internal and external sources. Geothermal energy from radioactive isotopes and rotational energy from the spinning of the Earth are internal sources of energy, while the Sun is the major external source, driving certain systems, like our weather and our climate.

Sunlight warms the surface and atmosphere in varying amounts, and this causes convection, producing winds and influencing ocean currents. Infrared radiation, radiating out from the warmed surface of the Earth, gets trapped by greenhouse gases and further affects the energy flow.

From the TED-Ed Lesson A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

Animation by Marc Christoforidis

(via sci-universe)

sci-universe:

Each fall, millions of North American monarch butterflies migrate to California and Mexico for winter. They make a massive journey (up to 4,830 kilometers/3,000 miles) and use the sun to ensure that they stay on course. On cloudy days Earth’s magnetic field as a kind of backup navigational system. (read more here)